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Things I think about during lockdown


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#1
bill119

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Picture of my tailpipe.

Ok Ok nothing special but it's original and it's 16 years old , the point being I bet other members especially those of my generation can remember when exhaust pipes would last 18 months or two years if you were very lucky.

It's the same with bodywork somethings are far superior these days I can remember when we had new cars delivered with rust on the sills through being stored for months in a field, mainly British Leyland cars in the 1970's.

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#2
Terriea

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Picture of my tailpipe.
Ok Ok nothing special but it's original and it's 16 years old , the point being I bet other members especially those of my generation can remember when exhaust pipes would last 18 months or two years if you were very lucky.
It's the same with bodywork somethings are far superior these days I can remember when we had new cars delivered with rust on the sills through being stored for months in a field, mainly British Leyland cars in the 1970's.

Sales of Gungum and exhaust bandage have certainly dropped! It used to be routine maintenence didn't it?!
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#3
bill119

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Picture of my tailpipe.
Ok Ok nothing special but it's original and it's 16 years old , the point being I bet other members especially those of my generation can remember when exhaust pipes would last 18 months or two years if you were very lucky.
It's the same with bodywork somethings are far superior these days I can remember when we had new cars delivered with rust on the sills through being stored for months in a field, mainly British Leyland cars in the 1970's.

Sales of Gungum and exhaust bandage have certainly dropped! It used to be routine maintenence didn't it?!

 

 Even worse than that I used to use a lot of asbestos rope and remember spitting out the bits of fluff as I stood underneath it.


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#4
Kev5

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I must say that the tail-pipes on my (nearly) 5 year-old ND are more pitted than yours, Bill.

 

The 1984 Volvo 740 saloon that was our family car for 16 years needed a new exhaust every 2½ years! The OE Volvo exhausts did 2½ years and the cheaper aftermarket ones did about 2 years. The big 2.3 litre four-pot was pre-cat and still on a carburettor (twin-choke Pierburg) and was very inefficient, producing loads of pollution and moisture out through the tail-pipe. Cars of that era (and before) used to leave their own vapour trail on a cold morning! 

 

That beast lasted for 33 years in total, only having two more owners after us, finishing it's days as a slipway boat-tug with a tow-bar on the front as well as the rear and sporting a massive roof rack which was used as a viewing platform for point-to-point horse racing spectators! A very far cry from the love and care that I cherished upon it during it's time as our family car.


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#5
bill119

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I mentioned British Leyland earlier, now I don't want to stir up a Hornets nest or get controversial, just my opinion,  but I think Leyland cars would have gone on for a lot longer if it wasn't for Red Robbo .  :bored:


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#6
Rosko

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I am amazed by the length of time that modern cars last looking good these days ! It is nothing to see a 20 year old car polished up and looking amazing . Back in the 70's if a car did 100,000 miles it would be a real achievement but these days it is a regular occurrence . 


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#7
bill119

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Getting back to exhausts  I once had an exhaust fitted at " Charlie Browns "  when they had a lifetime guarantee promotion, best thing I ever did , I had a Ford Sierra exhaust fitted under the scheme and they didn't bank on people like me who keep their cars for ten years and I had three silencers fitted in that time. They planned on people keeping their cars for two to three years. In fairness to " Charlie Browns " they never quibbled.

 

Can't you tell I'm bored I rely on good old 'mx5life' to keep me sane.  :coffee:


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#8
Wrangler

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Getting back to exhausts  I once had an exhaust fitted at " Charlie Browns "  when they had a lifetime guarantee promotion, best thing I ever did , I had a Ford Sierra exhaust fitted under the scheme and they didn't bank on people like me who keep their cars for ten years and I had three silencers fitted in that time. They planned on people keeping their cars for two to three years. In fairness to " Charlie Browns " they never quibbled.

 

Can't you tell I'm bored I rely on good old 'mx5life' to keep me sane.  :coffee:

I did the same thing on an 81 Dodge that I owned. Bought a life ime muffler from Sears, (were they in the U.K.?). They fitted one per year for the 9 additional years that I owned the car. I wanted to fit a Cat Back to my MK1, but could not bring myself to replace a perfectly good system that was factory installed 20 years earlier. 


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#9
Rosko

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Sounds like the Sony Video Tape warranty , they were supposed to last a lifetime !


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#10
MJL

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It's the same with bodywork somethings are far superior these days I can remember when we had new cars delivered with rust on the sills through being stored for months in a field, mainly British Leyland cars in the 1970's.

Thanks, Bill. Good topic.

 

I had a new Honda station wagon delivered with rust in the tailgate in the 1970s! It wasn't only British cars.


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#11
Qu1ckn1ck

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It's the same with bodywork somethings are far superior these days I can remember when we had new cars delivered with rust on the sills through being stored for months in a field, mainly British Leyland cars in the 1970's.

Thanks, Bill. Good topic.

 

I had a new Honda station wagon delivered with rust in the tailgate in the 1970s! It wasn't only British cars.

 

 

The British cars were not even the worst.  I loved my AlfaSud and Veloce but the RUST !!


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#12
Terriea

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I must say that the tail-pipes on my (nearly) 5 year-old ND are more pitted than yours, Bill.

The 1984 Volvo 740 saloon that was our family car for 16 years needed a new exhaust every 2½ years! The OE Volvo exhausts did 2½ years and the cheaper aftermarket ones did about 2 years. The big 2.3 litre four-pot was pre-cat and still on a carburettor (twin-choke Pierburg) and was very inefficient, producing loads of pollution and moisture out through the tail-pipe. Cars of that era (and before) used to leave their own vapour trail on a cold morning!

That beast lasted for 33 years in total, only having two more owners after us, finishing it's days as a slipway boat-tug with a tow-bar on the front as well as the rear and sporting a massive roof rack which was used as a viewing platform for point-to-point horse racing spectators! A very far cry from the love and care that I cherished upon it during it's time as our family car.

Nothing to do with exhausts, but my partner's Dad had a 740 estate from new, and after about 12 years the local funeral business (who he had dealt with for years as an Interflora agent) approached him to ask if he'd sell it to them. Apparently it was the only standard estate car which would take a body in the back! They used it for collections apparently..

#13
Garffey

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Picture of my tailpipe.

Ok Ok nothing special but it's original and it's 16 years old , the point being I bet other members especially those of my generation can remember when exhaust pipes would last 18 months or two years if you were very lucky.

It's the same with bodywork somethings are far superior these days I can remember when we had new cars delivered with rust on the sills through being stored for months in a field, mainly British Leyland cars in the 1970's.

 

Yes Bill...I remember when you were lucky if exhausts outlasted the guarantee!....

 

The last exhaust I purchased was a stainless steel job on my Pajero Junior....and while the previous owner had done a couple of 'bodge jobs' on the old system, the car was registered in 1996!


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#14
Roddy

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I must be completely flipped. Found myself talking to a computer just now. What is this Siri thing? Oh you can talk to her and she will answer questions. Oh yea? Turn it on, page appears with the words Hello, how can I help you? Well in for a penny in for a pound. "Hello Siri I say. I get the answer back "I don't think we have been introduced. At that point I cracked up. 



#15
Ali5

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Ask her to tell you a joke x
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#16
Pat

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I must be completely flipped. Found myself talking to a computer just now. What is this Siri thing? Oh you can talk to her and she will answer questions. Oh yea? Turn it on, page appears with the words Hello, how can I help you? Well in for a penny in for a pound. "Hello Siri I say. I get the answer back "I don't think we have been introduced. At that point I cracked up. 

:giggle:


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#17
Dewi RS

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I mentioned British Leyland earlier, now I don't want to stir up a Hornets nest or get controversial, just my opinion,  but I think Leyland cars would have gone on for a lot longer if it wasn't for Red Robbo .  :bored:

It's always good to stir up a hornet's nest Bill :giggle:.  Red Robbo was indeed a major influence in the demise of B.L but there were also many other factors.  It was like history repeating itself where nobody took the relentless march of the Japanese motorcycle industry seriously and they flooded UK, European and U.S markets with innovative and reliable (oil tight) bikes which eventually saw off UK & European motorcycle manufacturing, and only really Harley surviving in the States.   Our motorcycle industry could be forgiven for that because nobody saw it coming and we genuinely believed back then that we made the best products in the world.

 

Fast forward a few years and the same thing was obviously happening to our car making industries, we saw it coming this time but still nothing was done which was shameful. We were still producing "facelifted shyte" based on technology going back to the '30s. Lack of investment and the creation of a monster that was too big control, and with the pugnacious Michael Edwardes at the helm to oversee bad management it was all a recipe for disaster. With B.L being partially nationalised it was all the catalyst required for left wing miltants like Derek Robinson to show their hand, they weren't taking on B.L they were taking on the government of the day.

 

If you've ever been to the Heritage museum, you'll have seen some of the cars that were in development for replacing the old designs us Brits had been buying for years, some of which would have been a good match for the Japanese, but lack of investment meant they never got past first base.


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#18
bill119

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I mentioned British Leyland earlier, now I don't want to stir up a Hornets nest or get controversial, just my opinion,  but I think Leyland cars would have gone on for a lot longer if it wasn't for Red Robbo .  :bored:

It's always good to stir up a hornet's nest Bill :giggle:.  Red Robbo was indeed a major influence in the demise of B.L but there were also many other factors.  It was like history repeating itself where nobody took the relentless march of the Japanese motorcycle industry seriously and they flooded UK, European and U.S markets with innovative and reliable (oil tight) bikes which eventually saw off UK & European motorcycle manufacturing, and only really Harley surviving in the States.   Our motorcycle industry could be forgiven for that because nobody saw it coming and we genuinely believed back then that we made the best products in the world.

 

Fast forward a few years and the same thing was obviously happening to our car making industries, we saw it coming this time but still nothing was done which was shameful. We were still producing "facelifted shyte" based on technology going back to the '30s. Lack of investment and the creation of a monster that was too big control, and with the pugnacious Michael Edwardes at the helm to oversee bad management it was all a recipe for disaster. With B.L being partially nationalised it was all the catalyst required for left wing miltants like Derek Robinson to show their hand, they weren't taking on B.L they were taking on the government of the day.

 

If you've ever been to the Heritage museum, you'll have seen some of the cars that were in development for replacing the old designs us Brits had been buying for years, some of which would have been a good match for the Japanese, but lack of investment meant they never got past first base.

 

Clean forgot about Michael Edwardes, thanks for that Dewi.


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#19
Roddy

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Not just the motorcycle and car industries ws it. We built the best ships but using outdated methods because the yard owners wouldn't invest. Then along comes the big boxes, so Stevedores were finished. Where has our cotton and clothing industry gone. A lot because of outdated practices again. The gradual loss of engineering skills impacted then on railway works and the whole country went into decline after post war austerity, and spending what we did have rebuilding Europe. Outdated technology, militant workforce, upcoming competition, a failing Empire, and we lost the lot, right down to our own fruit producing farmers. We have seen an industrial revolution of a different sort.


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#20
Dewi RS

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Not just the motorcycle and car industries ws it. We built the best ships but using outdated methods because the yard owners wouldn't invest. Then along comes the big boxes, so Stevedores were finished. Where has our cotton and clothing industry gone. A lot because of outdated practices again. The gradual loss of engineering skills impacted then on railway works and the whole country went into decline after post war austerity, and spending what we did have rebuilding Europe. Outdated technology, militant workforce, upcoming competition, a failing Empire, and we lost the lot, right down to our own fruit producing farmers. We have seen an industrial revolution of a different sort.

The costs of Capitalism Rodders, and you're dead right - it wasnt just the motor industry which suffered.  Capitalism feeds on growth and profit but only to the point where costs to produce, via higher wages to keep your skilled workforce and more expensive raw materials, are more than you can sell your products / services for, and as for investment, forget it - it eats into profits too much.. To maintain profit you need to find more efficient production methods or trim down your workforce - or both, as illustrated by your comment about the "big boxes". 

 

And there's the problem, we need people in work to earn money to spend money - it's what makes the economy go round and keeps it bouyant.  So what did we do to keep earning a profit?  We turned to countries like Japan who were making everything cheaper than we were because they had a lower paid workforce, which meant lots of UK money went abroad, and that gave them the intitial foothold into our marlketplaces.  Now of course we're turning away from Japan as their costs became higher and ended up sourcing goods from the likes of Taiwan / Malaysia / Korea and now of course good old China.  We've even got workers here from Eastern Europe fruit picking for gawds sake! 

 

Back in the B.L days our motor and general manfacturing industries were already doomed even without the likes of Edwardes and Red Robbo, we were the victims of our own profit driven economy and were never going to compete on price with poorer countries on cost while they had a workforce willing to work for buttons. In many ways China proves the point that most people buy on price above quality - they really do churn out some real crap!  :giggle:


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