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Spending the kid's inheritance .............
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The rather nondescript Triumph Herald in this photo belongs to Stuart. It had previously belonged for many years to his grandfather and was sold away from the family.
Many years later Stuart found and purchased the Herald and has run it for several years in it's unrestored condition in memory of his grandfather.
74803
 

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Amongst the many cars in my past Nick the Herald played a big part, due to the step fathers love of them....( he also had a two tone blue one...but not for long).
Ours was green and white, and even had a trailer painted in matching colours for when we went camping!
Great times...
 

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I always loved the Herald, I remember as a kid being surrounded by old Ford Pops & Morris 8s etc and it looked thoroughly modern in comparison. I always wanted my Dad to get one but he was a died in the wool BMC man so we had a string of A35 vans and then an A40. The nearest I got to him getting one was when he had one in his garage for repair or a service
 

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The thing I remember most about the Herald apart from being able to get at the engine easily was the turning circle, has any other car come close to matching them, of course if you used full lock it didn't do the tyres any good.
 

Spending the kid's inheritance .............
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Many Driving Schools used them in the early 1960s, including the one I took lessons with. I seem to remember my driving instructor getting upset if I rode the clutch. I think he was exaggerating when he said his dual control Herald needed a new clutch every six weeks.
 

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Many Driving Schools used them in the early 1960s, including the one I took lessons with. I seem to remember my driving instructor getting upset if I rode the clutch. I think he was exaggerating when he said his dual control Herald needed a new clutch every six weeks.
' Many a true word spoken in jest' We once had a customer who had new clutches every 6000 miles in a Hillman Minx. I bet a driving school does something close to that. :rolleyes:
 

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I love this thread and I love Triumph Heralds too!

A short tale from my Herald days...

My very first car was a 1961 948cc Herald in faded Litchfield Green and cost me 拢35. That was in 1972, so it was already 11 years old and riddled with rust. I had new outriggers welded in and did much filling and painting during my 2陆 year ownership, including repaired floor-pans, three engine rebuilds, countless front trunnion kits, a clutch, a repaired diff carrier bracket, new carpets, new wheel cylinders all round (drum brakes) - the list was endless, but I learned a great deal from this early car.

The original engine popped a piston just one day after buying it, so I put a set of 'Hepolite PEP' (remember those?) pistons in it and I learned much about engine rebuilding after that!
About a year later another piston went, so my dad got me a lower mileage engine which I rebuilt and replaced myself, lifting the old one out by standing on the front wheels with a rope around my neck and heaving it out (minus cylinder head) doing my back in at the same time!!

My first wife and me travelled all over the country in that old 948, taking in Cornwall, North Wales, The Midlands and London - all from North Devon, so very long trips in those days. Alas, the little 948 motor blew yet another piston eventually on our way up to Hertford and had to get it recovered (very expensive even then!) ... The trouble with the 948 engine was that it was taken straight from the old Standard 10 and wasn't up to motorways and long, hard trips. It only had a bypass oil filter and babbitt-lined bearing shells, whereas the newer 1147cc motors had a full-flow oil filter and copper-lead-indium bearings and was a stronger engine.

My next Herald was a 1968 13/60 convertible in Wedgewood Blue and it was a beauty. 7 years old in 1975 when I bought it and it had only done 30,000 miles. I fitted a new hood and polished and fettled it until it "shone like a tanner up a sweeps RS"!! I kept it for a number of years and It received many admiring comments wherever we went. I eventually sold it to a mate who was learning to drive and he managed to stuff it up a lamp post just a fortnight later, completely writing it off!

Thanks for reading!

Kev 馃檪
 

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I love this thread and I love Triumph Heralds too!

A short tale from my Herald days...

My very first car was a 1961 948cc Herald in faded Litchfield Green and cost me 拢35. That was in 1972, so it was already 11 years old and riddled with rust. I had new outriggers welded in and did much filling and painting during my 2陆 year ownership, including repaired floor-pans, three engine rebuilds, countless front trunnion kits, a clutch, a repaired diff carrier bracket, new carpets, new wheel cylinders all round (drum brakes) - the list was endless, but I learned a great deal from this early car.

The original engine popped a piston just one day after buying it, so I put a set of 'Hepolite PEP' (remember those?) pistons in it and I learned much about engine rebuilding after that!
About a year later another piston went, so my dad got me a lower mileage engine which I rebuilt and replaced myself, lifting the old one out by standing on the front wheels with a rope around my neck and heaving it out (minus cylinder head) doing my back in at the same time!!

My first wife and me travelled all over the country in that old 948, taking in Cornwall, North Wales, The Midlands and London - all from North Devon, so very long trips in those days. Alas, the little 948 motor blew yet another piston eventually on our way up to Hertford and had to get it recovered (very expensive even then!) ... The trouble with the 948 engine was that it was taken straight from the old Standard 10 and wasn't up to motorways and long, hard trips. It only had a bypass oil filter and babbitt-lined bearing shells, whereas the newer 1147cc motors had a full-flow oil filter and copper-lead-indium bearings and was a stronger engine.

My next Herald was a 1968 13/60 convertible in Wedgewood Blue and it was a beauty. 7 years old in 1975 when I bought it and it had only done 30,000 miles. I fitted a new hood and polished and fettled it until it "shone like a tanner up a sweeps RS"!! I kept it for a number of years and It received many admiring comments wherever we went. I eventually sold it to a mate who was learning to drive and he managed to stuff it up a lamp post just a fortnight later, completely writing it off!

Thanks for reading!

Kev 馃檪
what a sad ending to a loved car
 

Spending the kid's inheritance .............
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Wheel Tire Car Automotive parking light Vehicle registration plate


I was parked next to a 13/60 Convertible at the Buntingford Classic last Saturday. Unfortunately it was yellow rather than blue !
 

Spending the kid's inheritance .............
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The rather nondescript Triumph Herald in this photo belongs to Stuart. It had previously belonged for many years to his grandfather and was sold away from the family.
Many years later Stuart found and purchased the Herald and has run it for several years in it's unrestored condition in memory of his grandfather. View attachment 74803
Stuart, the current owner of his late grandfather's Herald has commented as a result of the photo "Yes, the little Herald is hanging-in there. After being on the road for 8 years in that state, I've realised what my limitations are. Plans are afoot to get the body and paintwork tidied-up, so it may be less recognisable in future! " Rather a pity to alter it to my mind ...
 

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Plans are afoot to get the body and paintwork tidied-up, so it may be less recognisable in future! " Rather a pity to alter it to my mind ...
Yes mine too Nick, rather see a 'careworn' example than a garage queen!
 
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As the thread title is Hommage to his Grandfather....Over the last 10 years or so, I decided to collect all the cars I could remember my Step-father Sean having but in 1:43 rd scale die cast, because it would cost a fortune!...lol, In homage and for influencing me as a 10 year old....The only one I've struggled with is a Fiat 126 coupe like this one...Fiat 128 3P 1100 Sport 1975 1:18 LM106B Model car 1:18 Laudoracing....sadly he had a bad accident in it in Bradford, which made the front page of the Telegraph and Argus :eek:.....

The rest are pictured here.....
Car Automotive parking light Land vehicle Vehicle Automotive tail & brake light


And some of the stories behind them....
The Fiat 500 being the last car I remember him having and visiting us in it before he passed away...
The Herald for the camping trips.
The Hillman Minx for boiling its gearbox oil regulary...it was an auto!
The Cortina for being a quick car as a 1500gt.
105E Anglia as the first car I ever drove.
The Vauxhall Victor, as the car we had when we moved into the house I still live in in 1971.
The Mk2 Jag that slipped off the jack and nearly crushed him to death...:eek:
The Cresta which I loved too, but last saw at the bottom of a pile in a scrap yard!
The Rover, for being a car he 'stole back' after it was bought off him with a 拢100 bounced cheque!
The two tone Ford Consul/Zephyr (I think)....for being brush painted, in exactly the same colours!
And the others for mainly just being nice cars!
 

Spending the kid's inheritance .............
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
A great collection. Rather more impressive than my collection of photos of all the ships that my father sailed in as a Merchant Navy cadet and officer.
 

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A great collection. Rather more impressive than my collection of photos of all the ships that my father sailed in as a Merchant Navy cadet and officer.
But nonetheless a great memory Nick.......(y)
 
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